Charity donors – Donors Net http://donorsnet.net/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 18:43:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://donorsnet.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Charity donors – Donors Net http://donorsnet.net/ 32 32 UK universities receive £7m from Russian donors over five years https://donorsnet.net/uk-universities-receive-7m-from-russian-donors-over-five-years/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 16:59:29 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/uk-universities-receive-7m-from-russian-donors-over-five-years/ Top UK universities have accepted more than £7 million in funding from Russian sources over the past five years, openDemocracy can reveal. It includes at least £3.4million from donors with close ties to the Kremlin. The Colleges and Universities Union (UCU) today criticized higher education institutions for helping oligarchs and authoritarian governments to ‘bleach their […]]]>

Top UK universities have accepted more than £7 million in funding from Russian sources over the past five years, openDemocracy can reveal.

It includes at least £3.4million from donors with close ties to the Kremlin.

The Colleges and Universities Union (UCU) today criticized higher education institutions for helping oligarchs and authoritarian governments to ‘bleach their reputation’ by donating to the sector – but said the united should be better funded to avoid relying on unsavory liquidity.

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Oxford University alone has accepted more than £5m, including £2.6m from the Russian-British son of an oligarch now under sanctions.

He also accepted £3million from one of Russia’s richest men, Vladimir Potanin, who was recently appointed to parliament as one of Vladimir Putin’s ‘buddies’.

The findings come as the UK government plans to crack down on “undue foreign influence” in universities, forcing them to report any financial arrangements with “foreign actors”.

Under the new measuresuniversities should declare any donations over £75,000 from overseas states that are not close allies of the UK.

openDemocracy has now discovered that at least 14 major universities have accepted funding from Russian sources. The figures have been released under the Freedom of Information Act and cover the past five years.

“No university should be accepting donations from oligarchs or authoritarian governments who are trying to whitewash their reputation,” said Quinn Roache, head of policy and equality at UCU. “Clearly there needs to be a lot more scrutiny of where college money comes from.”

But he said government proposals to manage foreign donations are “difficult to take seriously” when the Conservative Party itself accepts money from Russian sources.

He added: ‘If the government is serious about stopping these kinds of donations, they need to fund universities properly so they don’t turn to big donors.’

Friday, the Times reported that the University of Oxford had taken a £2.6m giveaway of Said Gutseriev in 2019. His father, Mikhail Gutseriev, is an oil tycoon who was sanctioned by UK and is on the US Treasury’s “Putin List”.

The Times said the gift came just months after she received shares from her father worth millions – although there was no suggestion of wrongdoing on the part of Said Gutseriev, who holds the nationality. British.

Elsewhere, the University of Nottingham has accepted funding for a Russian government scholarship worth £12,000, as well as funding of £113,000 from a Russian university.

Last year, Queen’s University Belfast was awarded nearly £47,000 for a ‘Russian Federation Presidential Scholarship’, funded by the Russian Ministry of Science and Higher Education. After first accepting the grant in April last year, the university said it was now on hold.

The Russian Ministry of Education and Science also gave £20,000 to the University of Leeds in 2019 and over £10,000 to the University of Bristol in 2018.

Heriot-Watt University received nearly £100,000 in research funding from a university and two Russian-based companies, while Imperial College London also received £720,000 from a Russian company to fund energy efficiency research.

Cambridge University told openDemocracy that it has not accepted money from Russian sources for the past five years. But it was given £260,000 from two Gazprom subsidiaries between 2013 and 2015.

Not included in the overall figures, the university also took £888,000 from LetterOne, a European investment firm which had a number of Russian billionaires on its board. They resigned earlier this yearwhen two of the main shareholders of the company were placed under sanctions.

Meanwhile, the University of East London said it had a partnership with Russia’s Kazan University since 2014.

When Russia invaded Ukraine, scholars and politicians wrote a letter highlighting how UK universities are ‘repositories’ of the wealth of Russia and Eurasia.

“There is no requirement at this time to publish such donation information, so those in the public domain may be the tip of a very large iceberg,” the letter said.

They called on university leaders to carry out stricter checks and be more transparent about finances.

Last week Oxford University faced calls to return Said Gutseriev’s £2.6million gift. Susan Hawley, executive director of Spotlight on Corruption, told The Times: “It is simply unacceptable for a major UK university to withhold donations from a businessman who was a top business official in Russia under the regime. of Putin.

“Oxford University must either return this money or donate it to a charity supporting the reconstruction of Ukraine.”

The university has also been asked to repay money it received in 2019 from Vladimir Potanin, who was Russia’s deputy prime minister in the 1990s and is now chairman of one of the world’s largest metal producers. .

Speaking to openDemocracy earlier this year, Labor MP Margaret Hodge said: “While it is true that Potanin has donated to the University of Oxford, I expect this venerable institution to do what’s needed.

“Oxford should sever all ties with Potanin, call Time on the Exchange on its behalf and – instead of returning the money – why not donate it to a major anti-corruption campaign organization, like Spotlight on Corruption? “

Universities UK, which represents higher education bosses, said it has asked universities to review any funding from Russian-linked sources after the country invaded Ukraine.

A spokesperson said: “Universities exercise due diligence on funding from external sources on an ongoing review basis in accordance with government regulations and the most accurate financial information available at the time.”

Oxford University has previously defended itself from receiving donations from certain Russian sources, saying it has a “robust approval process”. A spokesperson added that the university was “deeply saddened by the events unfolding in Ukraine”.


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Donors raise $110,000 for One Kids Place https://donorsnet.net/donors-raise-110000-for-one-kids-place/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 20:37:02 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/donors-raise-110000-for-one-kids-place/ Content of the article Covid, homelessness, mass shootings, war in Ukraine, climate change. Content of the article It’s getting harder and harder to feel good about the future with all that’s going on. But that all changed on Monday, when the One Kids Place team hosted their annual golf tournament. “A great day attended by […]]]>

Content of the article

Covid, homelessness, mass shootings, war in Ukraine, climate change.

Content of the article

It’s getting harder and harder to feel good about the future with all that’s going on.

But that all changed on Monday, when the One Kids Place team hosted their annual golf tournament.

“A great day attended by great people on a beautiful golf course, all coming together to help support a great organization,” said Greg Saunders.

“At the end of the golf, the group would come together to break bread, share a bottle of wine and discuss the great – and not so great – golf that day.”

The day, Saunders said, was “not so different from other charity golf tournaments…until it wasn’t.

“Scott Clark was doing his shtick on the mic as the host of the evening.”

Clark, he said, “has a unique talent for using his dark magic to get people to bid higher for auction items they didn’t even know they needed.”

Jessica Foy is a social worker and Kaelan Marshall is a speech therapist at OKP.

“I can’t imagine a nobler occupation than working with children like these two young women do every day. Jessica and Kaelan drew the attention of the room to very specific, specialized and expensive equipment that allows non-verbal children to communicate their thoughts.

Marshall explained how the unit works and the dramatic impact it would have on the lives of children at One Kids Place.

They hoped to raise the $24,000 needed to purchase one of these units for children served by One Kids Place.

Then the offers started pouring in. Hand after hand was raised.

Content of the article

“I will donate $6,000.”

“I will donate $6,000.”

“I will donate $6,000.”

“I will donate $6,000.”

Four people each offering to pay 25% of the cost of this life-changing technology.

Here it is, bought and paid for, mission accomplished.

But it wasn’t quite over yet. A voice from the crowd shouted “I think this coin can buy another one.”

Clark looked around the room, shrugged, and moments later four more hands went up, each offering to pay 25% of the cost of another unit.

No sooner had that been accomplished than another voice called, “Let’s do three.”

In total, the event raised over $110,000 for the organization.

Saunders, on behalf of the Board, thanked Kathy Strang and her team who organized the event as well as Brenda Loubert and the One Kids Place team.


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Campership Fund donors are poised to rise to the challenge https://donorsnet.net/campership-fund-donors-are-poised-to-rise-to-the-challenge/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 22:31:51 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/campership-fund-donors-are-poised-to-rise-to-the-challenge/ WATERBURY – Enthusiastic supporters of the Greater Waterbury Campership Fund are closing in on a fundraising challenge that will trigger an additional $10,000 for the 2022 campaign. With nearly two weeks to go, contributions to Ion Bank’s $10,000 challenge have reached $8,145, leaving just $1,855 to raise by June 30. If donations meet or exceed […]]]>

WATERBURY – Enthusiastic supporters of the Greater Waterbury Campership Fund are closing in on a fundraising challenge that will trigger an additional $10,000 for the 2022 campaign.

With nearly two weeks to go, contributions to Ion Bank’s $10,000 challenge have reached $8,145, leaving just $1,855 to raise by June 30. If donations meet or exceed this amount, the Ion Bank Foundation will contribute an additional $9,000, and David Rotatori, CEO and President of Ion, and his wife, Pam, will contribute an additional $1,000 through their Rotatori Foundation.

In short, the $10,000 raised turns into $20,000, with every penny going towards sending underprivileged youth in Greater Waterbury to a week of summer camp once the schools complete their current school year.

Ion Bank and its foundation are using “Change a Life This Summer” as a rallying cry to urge all friends of the Fund to take up the challenge.

“We are lucky to have a lot of supporters,” said David Rotatori. “We’re almost at the goal line, so let’s give the final push and get all these kids to camp.”

Contributions since the start of the new year have climbed to $46,345, with a target goal of $160,000. Tuition for the potential group of 340 campers would be around $156,000. Last year, 238 children participated at a cost of $98,303.

A new online portal to facilitate the donation process is rapidly gaining traction. Of the $3,320 donated last week, $425 came from online donations.

Donations are accepted year round and can be sent to the Greater Waterbury Campership Fund, 389 Meadow St., Waterbury, CT 06722; dropped off at the Republican-American Building at this address; or made at Greaterwaterburycampershipfund.org.

Amazon Prime shoppers can select the Campership Fund as their charity of choice when shopping online.

The Campership Fund, a 501(c)3, requires no salary or expenses for running the program which is overseen by an all-volunteer Board of Directors. Other expenses, such as those arising from the organization of special events for the benefit of the fund, are covered by separate donations of money and services.

Contributions totaling $3,320 were recently received from:

Verna M. Lingis, Waterbury, in memory of Joseph Lingis, $500

Thomas J. and Lisa A. Vanotti, Torrington, in honor of Dave and Pam Rotatori, $250

n George J. Strobel III and Elaine MR Strobel, Middlebury, $250

Caren Bouchard, Prospect, $200

Kathleen McPadden, Naugatuck, $100

George and Helen Dowden, Cheshire, $100

Bryan J. Mulville, Southbury, in memory of Judge William “Tocco” Sullivan, $100

n Amanda K. Nardozzi, Waterbury, in honor of matching fund for Dave and Pam Rotatori, $100

Frank J. Travisano, Woodbury, in memory of my wife Marie Ponzillo Travisano, $100

Donald G. and Maria J. Michaud, prospect, $100

Donald J. and Lucille Ciampi, Middlebury, in memory of William “Tocco” Sullivan, $100

Douglas M. Dallon, Southbury, $100

Richard W. and Elaine Tomlinson, Watertown, in memory of Robert Ashley, $100

Anonymous, $100

Martha W. Barhydt, Watertown, $35

Charles H. Upson III, Washington, Connecticut, $35

James Pelletier Sr. and Germaine I. Pelletier, Wolcott, in honor of matching fund for Dave and Pam Rotatori, $25

Sandra Gold, Southbury, $25


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Infobip enters into a new fundraising partnership to help families in need https://donorsnet.net/infobip-enters-into-a-new-fundraising-partnership-to-help-families-in-need/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 11:18:21 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/infobip-enters-into-a-new-fundraising-partnership-to-help-families-in-need/ Kuwait Association for Needy Families (KANF)’s use of Infobip’s Conversations, Responses and Moments aims to create exciting new ways for the organization to secure funding for those in need through communication. transparent, prompt and timely. Using the region’s most popular communication channel, WhatsApp, to facilitate communication with KANF donors and families in need, Infobip’s intersection […]]]>

Kuwait Association for Needy Families (KANF)’s use of Infobip’s Conversations, Responses and Moments aims to create exciting new ways for the organization to secure funding for those in need through communication. transparent, prompt and timely.

Using the region’s most popular communication channel, WhatsApp, to facilitate communication with KANF donors and families in need, Infobip’s intersection of services will optimize the engagement and fundraising process. for all stakeholders.

With Infobip Answers, donors can receive information on how to contribute via their phone, while donors and recipients have access to 24/7 answers on FAQs and share updates. . Thanks to conversations, KANF will now be able to respond to special requests from families and donors via a chatbot. Through Moments, KANF will be able to reach its donors locally and regionally through many channels such as SMS, email and WhatsApp to promote KANF’s charitable programs and how to connect with KANF to deposit donations.

On the other hand, families will now be able to contact KANF, submit funding requests, and receive timely updates and feedback on the status of their applications and inquiries.

KANF is also keen to highlight how they plan to further engage their audience by adopting an AI chatbot to further facilitate communication with their donors and families in need. Additionally, by creating targeted campaigns and reaching affected communities on their favorite chat apps, all with the overall goal of closing the gap between donors and families in need.

“Kuwaiti Association for Needy Families is always keen to bridge the gap between donors and needy families. We have adopted the best communication platforms from Infobip to facilitate the donation process and provide exceptional service to families in need. We are currently adopting chatbot – Answers, live agent platform – Conversations and donation campaign automation solution – Moments to reach donors locally in Kuwait and regionally across GCC to raise funds to forever support families in need, through a wide range of communication channels like WhatsApp, social media, SMS and email,” explained Bader Al Mubarak, President of the Kuwait Association for Needy Families.

“Digital transformation is integral to the growth of charities. Through the adoption of technology and full use of social media channels, KANF will be able to better engage with donors, recipients and the community at large, making the process more personalized and more effective,” said Tamer Moustafa, account manager at Infobip.


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Gloucester ‘urgently’ needs 750 new blood donors, says NHS https://donorsnet.net/gloucester-urgently-needs-750-new-blood-donors-says-nhs/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 07:32:50 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/gloucester-urgently-needs-750-new-blood-donors-says-nhs/ The NHS says the city of Gloucester needs 750 new blood donors, with children at particular risk of medical problems without new supplies. Nationwide, one million more blood donors are needed over the next five years to ensure patients receive the right kind of blood to save and improve their lives, with a particular need […]]]>

The NHS says the city of Gloucester needs 750 new blood donors, with children at particular risk of medical problems without new supplies.

Nationwide, one million more blood donors are needed over the next five years to ensure patients receive the right kind of blood to save and improve their lives, with a particular need for black African donors, Caribbean blacks and younger. The blood service’s five-year strategy, released at the start of National Blood Week, sets ambitious plans to recruit up to one million new donors and double the number of regular donors with the rarest blood types.

This will ensure better blood group matching for patients in the future and reduce health inequalities, according to the NHS. Most people know the main blood types – O positive (35% of the population), O negative (13%), A positive (30%), A negative (8%), B positive (8%). , B negative (2%) and AB positive (2%). But the public is less familiar with the many subtypes that can provide an even better match to improve their treatment.

READ NEXT – Cirencester warning as fraud watchdog tracks ‘crash for cash’ scammers

There is a particularly urgent need for more black African and black Caribbean donors to treat people with sickle cell disease. Sickle cell disease is the fastest growing genetic blood disease in the UK and primarily affects people of black descent. It requires regular transfusions – most often with the specific blood subtype R oh .

Most patients are children and the demand for R oh blood is expected to double from 2016/17 to 2025/26. Fifty-five percent of black blood donors have the R oh subtype compared to 2.4% of donors of other ethnicities.

Stephen Cornes, director of blood supply at NHS Blood and Transplant, said: “Currently we can only meet around half of the demand for R oh blood through our existing donor base and the demand for this rare blood group is increasing. This means that many sickle cell patients often receive less well-matched blood, which, although clinically appropriate, may pose a longer-term risk for patients who receive regular transfusions.

“We urgently need new black African and black Caribbean donors to come forward and donate blood. In addition to the rarest blood types, we also need one million new donors over the next five years of all blood types As the NHS treats more patients, we also need to increase the total number of donors.

“We carefully manage inventory to ensure we don’t waste precious blood. If you can’t get an appointment right away, it’s because we have enough of your blood type right now. Please reserve for a later date or respond when we contact you.”

Dr Bola Owolabi, director of health inequalities at NHS England, said: ‘A shortage of blood donations from people of black descent often means that some patients do not receive the best blood type match and are therefore at risk of serious complications.

“Addressing inequalities in healthcare is a top priority for the NHS and increasing the number of black African and black Caribbean blood donors is crucial to improving outcomes for sickle cell patients in particular. I urge anyone able to donate blood to come forward as soon as possible – you are essential in saving the lives of your neighbours, friends and communities battling this disease.


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Charity:water believes donors have more to give than dollars – if you ask https://donorsnet.net/charitywater-believes-donors-have-more-to-give-than-dollars-if-you-ask/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 21:56:14 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/charitywater-believes-donors-have-more-to-give-than-dollars-if-you-ask/ The Nguyen family has always approached their philanthropy in a traditional way. Xuan and Hoa, immigrants from Vietnam, and their children, Alicia, Nicholas and Justin, have been generous with cash donations, often giving to organizations working in their home country and helping Vietnamese immigrants in the United States. Today, however, the Nguyens are leading a […]]]>

The Nguyen family has always approached their philanthropy in a traditional way. Xuan and Hoa, immigrants from Vietnam, and their children, Alicia, Nicholas and Justin, have been generous with cash donations, often giving to organizations working in their home country and helping Vietnamese immigrants in the United States.

Today, however, the Nguyens are leading a campaign to bring clean water to 1 million people around the world by 2030. How do you do that? Convince some 10,000 people to become monthly donors to charity wateran international development group that builds wells and drinking water systems.

The Nguyens have a huge passion for this project as well as a giant reach: they lead Global System Builder, a Bay Area company founded by Xuan. It provides financial education to individuals and families through more than 20,000 licensed agents in the United States and Canada, each of whom is recruited by the company for the project. Clients are also featured on Charity:water. Nearly two years into the effort, World System Builder has recruited more than 2,000 new Charity:water supporters. Donations total more than $1.1 million, including more than $800,000 from monthly donors, whose contributions will increase over the decade.

The Nguyens expanded their philanthropy because Charity:water long ago found ways for people to express their generosity in all kinds of ways beyond cash donations. The group very intentionally encourages supporters to give in their own way – with money, of course, but also using their talents and social connections.

Founded in 2006 by former nightclub promoter Scott Harrison, the organization pioneered digital birthday fundraisers, campaigns in which individuals solicit donations for charity on social media. Other Charity:water fundraising strategies have upended the nonprofit world or drawn criticism – such as the acceptance of shares of private companies this leads to bonuses for staff when the company goes public – but he is known for the creative ways he invites the public to show their support.

Global System Builder

Former nightclub promoter Scott Harrison founded Charity:water. Alicia Nguyen’s family (right of Harrison) is leading a campaign to bring clean water to 1 million people around the world by 2030.

Let your imagination run wild, the group urges supporters who wish to fundraise for the group, offering photos, branded materials and digital donation platforms. A group of teenagers promised to perform a song on Instagram dedicated to a donor for each gift; three adventurers crossed India in a rickshaw. The group celebrates children who raise money as little heroes and publishes the fundraising guide “World Changers: A Step-by-Step Guide to Empowering Kind Kids.”

“We realize some people might write a check for $2,000,” says Ben Greene, director of development. “Other people say, ‘I want to go out and raise $2,000.’ We want to provide them with resources and equip them with the tools to do so.

Two years ago, Charity:water created a “lifetime impact” measure – the original idea from then-newly hired Product Manager Chris Danner – to highlight the importance of supporters who put their drive, creativity and social networks to work for the organization. It’s a tally of the dollars they give plus the contributions of those they connect to the organization. When individuals bring a new monthly donor to the organization, their impact metric increases with each contribution from that person.

“Our hope is that this inspires people to continue and deepen their engagement with us,” says Greene. Since the measure was launched, the number of Charity:water supporters who have recruited others to join the monthly donor program has increased from 167 to 532.

by Daniel Olson impact measurement amounts to over $12,000, only about $800 of which he himself donated. When Olson first met Charity:water in 2017, he says he was “blown away” by her work and Harrison. “I decided this was an organization I didn’t just want to support; I want to get to know these people as humans,” he says.

ruler line

Videographer and photographer Daniel Olson created this video to promote his participation in the New York Marathon, which he ran for Charity:water.

ruler line

Olson broadcasts a creation agency based in Boise, Idaho, his hometown, and New York. He volunteered for Charity Photography: Aquatic Events. Last year, when he decided to run the New York Marathon to raise support, he threw himself into promoting his fundraiser. “I asked myself, ‘How can I leverage my skills and my personality and create something new to share what I do with my network and beyond?’ he says.

After flying from Boise to New York, he filmed a promotional video as he walked through Central Park. He shared the video with his social media network, which numbers in the thousands, eventually raising over $11,000. “Love and water – that’s all the world needs,” two friends wrote with their gift.

The Nguyens met Harrison when they invited him to speak at a virtual “Convention for Cause” meeting of their team of financial advisers. Impressed, they donated but also felt inspired to do more. Their personal finance training, they decided, lacked a fundamental lesson in how charity work can help people feel part of something bigger than themselves.

“What could be more powerful than teaching people this?” said Alicia Nguyen.

In his work, World System Builder aims to provide financial education to 30 million people by 2030. Xuan Nguyen has set a parallel Charity:water goal of providing safe drinking water to one million people and l announced at a meeting of all its members. The Nguyens showcase the project in newsletters and team calls, refocusing Charity:water’s monthly impact statements on wells constructed in various communities around the world. They also celebrate donors at company meetings and by posting their names on its website.

Alicia Nguyen says the project has helped bring together the community of World System Builder professionals, who work all over the world. “Clean water is something very universal, no matter where you come from or where you live,” says Nguyen. “It resonates with everyone.”


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Will the money-back guarantee appeal to wealthy donors? https://donorsnet.net/will-the-money-back-guarantee-appeal-to-wealthy-donors/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 18:26:58 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/will-the-money-back-guarantee-appeal-to-wealthy-donors/ A glossy book is coming to the homes and offices of America’s wealthiest individuals. Inside is a charity pitch that aims to raise up to $6 billion for nonprofits fighting global poverty. Proposal? Donate and get results — or your money back. Advocacy group Global Citizen and financial firm NPX are organizing this campaign. It […]]]>

A glossy book is coming to the homes and offices of America’s wealthiest individuals. Inside is a charity pitch that aims to raise up to $6 billion for nonprofits fighting global poverty.

Proposal? Donate and get results — or your money back.

Advocacy group Global Citizen and financial firm NPX are organizing this campaign. It targets the Forbes 400 billionaires, members of the Giving Pledge and the wealthy in general – a group increasingly criticized for what is seen as tight purse strings. The campaign launched recently with dinners, meetings, and a Wall Street Journal ad that asked, “Will you donate…if we get results?”

Initially, the effort aims to raise at least $150 million through six $25 million funds. Each of the programs could absorb up to $1 billion, according to campaign officials.

The will is an unusually large effort to tap into two great sources of capital – the wealth of individual philanthropists and the funds raised for impact investments that seek both social and financial returns. It’s also a test of whether a “pay-for-performance” model can get millions of dollars that go to social good but sit on the sidelines – including more than $1.3 trillion in foundation assets, $160 billion in donor-advised funds, and an estimated $700 billion managed by impact investment firms.

Many wealthy people worry that their money won’t be well spent or that results won’t follow, says Lindsay Beck, co-founder of NPX. They declare themselves ready to give – if they see a clear line in the results.

“I’ve heard that in many one-on-one meetings,” Beck says. “And that’s what we’re solving here. We’re saying, ‘OK, here are the results. “”

The “pay-for-results” financing plan would work as follows:

Donors would pledge to make donations, but the money would only be released when measurable results were achieved. For example, $500 from a donation could be allocated to each woman lifted out of poverty. If the nonprofit organization misses its goals, donors could shift the donations to another project or organization.

NPX and other impact investors, meanwhile, would lend the money for the program’s expansion. Their reimbursement, which would be based on donor money, would also be results-based. If the results were high, the output would be high, and vice versa.

Five associations are involved:

— BRAC will expand a program to lift 50,000 female-headed families in Bangladesh out of poverty.

— Charity: water for the drinking water supply of 500,000 people.

— The Global Fund to expand malaria care to treat an additional 5.1 million cases.

— The International Rescue Committee to educate 300,000 out-of-school young children in Bangladesh, Nigeria and Niger.

— The One Acre Fund to work with farmers in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi and Rwanda to increase food supply and reforestation.

Global Citizen and NPX reviewed these programs to ensure that their results were supported by evidence and could scale quickly. Research on International Rescue’s tutoring program, for example, found that third graders gained a year and a half in reading comprehension and reading aloud after 21 weeks of instruction. The cost: $63 per child.

The capital to scale these programs is all we need, says NPX’s Beck. “The solutions exist. We know how to provide access to clean water. We know how to educate children. We know how to increase food security. We know how to plant trees and sequester carbon.”

For many years, Global Citizen has advocated for increased public spending to achieve the United Nations’ 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, according to Mick Sheldrick, the organization’s chief policy officer. More recently, he has tried to persuade the wealthy to open their wallets through a Give While You Live campaign, urging the world’s billionaires to donate 5% of their wealth each year to important causes such as l help with COVID-19.

Tying donations to results could motivate big philanthropy in ways never seen before, Sheldrick says. “This is a case study. The potential really has no limits if it works.”

Each of the deals proposed by Global Citizen would create a funding agreement similar to a “social impact bond.” Typically, with impact bonds, private investors provide seed capital for an effort on climate, social services, etc. A municipality or regional or national government agency reimburses the investor — with interest — based on the success of the program.

The proposed Global Citizen impact bonds are unusual in both their size and the role of philanthropy in paying for results, says Emily Gustafsson-Wright, Brookings senior research fellow in global economics and development. If completed, she adds, it would be the largest results-based program in which philanthropy alone would provide results funding.

The Quality Education India Development Impact Bond, which aims to improve the outcomes of more than 200,000 primary school students, counts only philanthropy among its funders. These are the Michael and Susan Dell Foundation, Comic Relief, the Larry Ellison Foundation and the Mittal Foundation. But their combined commitment is only $9.2 million over four years.

Featured together, the six Global Citizen funds aim to make donors an offer they can’t refuse. “To be honest, it removes an excuse not to give,” Sheldrick says. “A donor can’t say, ‘You’re not covering my problem.'”

Chris Stadler, president of Global Citizen and managing partner of private equity firm CVC Capital Partners, said he plans to make a mid-to-high seven-figure contribution split between a donation and an impact investment. Investors will like the programs to be proven, Stadler says, which means there’s little risk to their capital. Donors will appreciate that their money only pays for results.

“We’d like to help connect people who struggle to find impact that can scale,” Stadler says.

Global Citizen and NPX expect financial industry executives to be attracted to the model, but also the wealthy in general. NPX donors include five Giving Pledge members: Richard and Joan Branson; Charlie and Candy Ergen; Gordon Gund (who signed the engagement with his late wife, Llura); Lyda Hill; and Pierre and Pam Omidyar.

____

This article was provided to The Associated Press by the Chronicle of Philanthropy. Drew Lindsay is a senior editor at the Chronicle. Email: draw.lindsay@philanthropy.com. The AP and the Chronicle are supported by the Lilly Endowment for coverage of philanthropy and nonprofits. The AP and the Chronicle are solely responsible for all content. For all of AP’s philanthropy coverage, visit https://apnews.com/hub/philanthropy.


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Will the money-back guarantee appeal to wealthy donors? | Economic news https://donorsnet.net/will-the-money-back-guarantee-appeal-to-wealthy-donors-economic-news/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 18:22:00 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/will-the-money-back-guarantee-appeal-to-wealthy-donors-economic-news/ By DREW LINDSAY of The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Chronicle of Philanthropy A glossy book is coming to the homes and offices of America’s wealthiest individuals. Inside is a charity pitch that aims to raise up to $6 billion for nonprofits fighting global poverty. Proposal? Donate and get results — or your money back. Advocacy group […]]]>

By DREW LINDSAY of The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Chronicle of Philanthropy

A glossy book is coming to the homes and offices of America’s wealthiest individuals. Inside is a charity pitch that aims to raise up to $6 billion for nonprofits fighting global poverty.

Proposal? Donate and get results — or your money back.

Advocacy group Global Citizen and financial firm NPX are organizing this campaign. It targets the Forbes 400 billionaires, members of the Giving Pledge and the wealthy in general – a group increasingly criticized for what is seen as tight purse strings. The campaign launched recently with dinners, meetings, and a Wall Street Journal ad that asked, “Will you donate…if we get results?”

Initially, the effort aims to raise at least $150 million through six $25 million funds. Each of the programs could absorb up to $1 billion, according to campaign officials.

political cartoons

The will is an unusually large effort to tap into two great sources of capital – the wealth of individual philanthropists and the funds raised for impact investments that seek both social and financial returns. It’s also a test of whether a ‘pay for results’ model can get millions of dollars that are earmarked for social good but sit on the sidelines – including more than $1.3 trillion in assets. foundation, $160 billion in donor-advised funds and an estimated $700 billion managed by impact investment firms.

Many wealthy people worry that their money won’t be well spent or that results won’t follow, says Lindsay Beck, co-founder of NPX. They declare themselves ready to give – if they see a clear line in the results.

“I’ve heard that in many one-on-one meetings,” Beck says. “And that’s what we’re solving here. We say, ‘OK, here are the results.’

The “pay for results” financing plan would work as follows:

Donors would pledge to make donations, but the money would only be released when measurable results were achieved. For example, $500 from a donation could be allocated to each woman lifted out of poverty. If the nonprofit organization misses its goals, donors could shift the donations to another project or organization.

NPX and other impact investors, meanwhile, would lend the money for the program’s expansion. Their reimbursement, which would be based on donor money, would also be results-based. If the results were high, the output would be high, and vice versa.

Five associations are involved:

— BRAC will expand a program to lift 50,000 female-headed families in Bangladesh out of poverty.

— Charity: water for the drinking water supply of 500,000 people.

— The Global Fund to expand malaria care to treat an additional 5.1 million cases.

— The International Rescue Committee to educate 300,000 young children out of school in Bangladesh, Nigeria and Niger.

— The One Acre Fund to work with farmers in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi and Rwanda to increase food supply and reforestation.

Global Citizen and NPX reviewed these programs to ensure that their results were supported by evidence and could scale quickly. Research on International Rescue’s tutoring program, for example, found that third graders gained a year and a half in reading comprehension and reading aloud after 21 weeks of instruction. The cost: $63 per child.

The capital to scale these programs is all we need, says NPX’s Beck. “The solutions exist. We know how to provide access to drinking water. We know how to educate children. We know how to increase food security. We know how to plant trees and sequester carbon.

For many years, Global Citizen has advocated for increased public spending to achieve the United Nations’ 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, according to Mick Sheldrick, the organization’s chief policy officer. More recently, he has tried to persuade the wealthy to open their wallets through a Give While You Live campaign, urging the world’s billionaires to donate 5% of their wealth each year to important causes such as l help with COVID-19.

Tying donations to results could motivate big philanthropy in ways never seen before, Sheldrick says. “It’s a case study. The potential really has no limit if it works.

Each of the deals proposed by Global Citizen would create a funding agreement similar to a “social impact bond.” Typically, with impact bonds, private investors provide seed capital for an effort on climate, social services, etc. A municipality or regional or national government agency reimburses the investor — with interest — based on the success of the program.

The proposed Global Citizen impact bonds are unusual in both their size and the role of philanthropy in paying for results, says Emily Gustafsson-Wright, Brookings senior research fellow in global economics and development. If completed, she adds, it would be the largest results-based program in which philanthropy alone would provide results funding.

The Quality Education India Development Impact Bond, which aims to improve the outcomes of more than 200,000 primary school students, counts only philanthropy among its funders. These are the Michael and Susan Dell Foundation, Comic Relief, the Larry Ellison Foundation and the Mittal Foundation. But their combined commitment is only $9.2 million over four years.

Featured together, the six Global Citizen funds are meant to make donors an offer they can’t refuse. “To be honest, it removes an excuse not to give,” Sheldrick says. “A donor can’t say, ‘You’re not covering my problem.'”

Chris Stadler, president of Global Citizen and managing partner of private equity firm CVC Capital Partners, said he plans to make a mid-to-high seven-figure contribution split between a donation and an impact investment. Investors will like the programs to be proven, Stadler says, which means there’s little risk to their capital. Donors will appreciate that their money only pays for results.

“We’d like to help connect people who struggle to find impact that can scale,” Stadler says.

Global Citizen and NPX expect financial industry executives to be attracted to the model, but also the wealthy in general. NPX donors include five Giving Pledge members: Richard and Joan Branson; Charlie and Candy Ergen; Gordon Gund (who signed the engagement with his late wife, Llura); Lyda Hill; and Pierre and Pam Omidyar.

This article was provided to The Associated Press by the Chronicle of Philanthropy. Drew Lindsay is a senior editor at the Chronicle. Email: draw.lindsay@philanthropy.com. The AP and the Chronicle are supported by the Lilly Endowment for coverage of philanthropy and nonprofit organizations. The AP and the Chronicle are solely responsible for all content. For all of AP’s philanthropy coverage, visit https://apnews.com/hub/philanthropy.

Copyright 2022 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


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S’pore Charity receives bug-infested mattresses from hotel and urges donors to be responsible https://donorsnet.net/spore-charity-receives-bug-infested-mattresses-from-hotel-and-urges-donors-to-be-responsible/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 05:12:43 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/spore-charity-receives-bug-infested-mattresses-from-hotel-and-urges-donors-to-be-responsible/ Singapore charity upset after receiving mattresses infested with bed bugs For charities, receiving donations from the public is always a good thing, because every penny will go a long way towards improving the lives of others. Unfortunately, some may take advantage of this to get rid of unusable items on their premises. Local charity Reach […]]]>

Singapore charity upset after receiving mattresses infested with bed bugs

For charities, receiving donations from the public is always a good thing, because every penny will go a long way towards improving the lives of others.

Unfortunately, some may take advantage of this to get rid of unusable items on their premises.

Local charity Reach Out has shared its disappointment on social media after receiving severely bedbug-infested mattresses from a hotel in Singapore.

Source: Contact Us Facebook

Volunteers have since urged donors to be more responsible and donate goods that are at least in decent condition so those less fortunate can use them without issue.

Singapore charity receives 24 bug-infested mattresses

According to Reach Out Facebook post On June 3, Administrator Grace Chuah shared an important public service announcement to those interested in donating to charity. She urged others to stop donating goods that cannot be repurposed in the name of goodwill.

Source: Contact Us Facebook

Reach Out had received a WhatsApp message from a hotel saying it would like to donate 24 of its pre-loved mattresses and couches.

Ms Chuah said the hotel also reassured them that the items were in “very good” condition.

Source: Contact Us Facebook

Delighted by the generous donation, the charity quickly arranged to collect the items.

However, Ms Chuah said their hearts sank after receiving them. Upon inspection, they found that the mattresses were badly infested with bed bugs.

charity mattress bugs

Source: Contact Us Facebook

Ms Chuah said the mattresses were stained with blackheads, infested with bed bugs crawling everywhere and overrun with termites. One can only imagine the disappointment felt by the volunteers.

charity mattress bugs

Source: Contact Us Facebook

She added that they were even more shocked to learn that the donations came from a “still operating hotel in Singapore” and not from an abandoned or old location.

Charity disappointed to be treated like rubbish collection services

Adding salt to the wound was the fact that the charity had shelled out its own money to cover moving and rental costs.

charity mattress bugs

Source: Contact Us Facebook

As it is not a full-time charity, they do not have permanent staff or a location to store used goods. They had to hire a professional mover and temporarily rent a warehouse to store the mattresses.

The volunteers expressed their disappointment at being “treated like rubbish removal services”.

We are volunteers, not garbage collectors.

Ms Chuah called on the public to ‘stop donating goods that cannot be repurposed in the name of goodwill’.

She reminded future donors not to make such irresponsible donations as they unnecessarily monopolize the association’s resources, which could have been better placed for the needy.

Reach Out is only open to accepting donations if the items are new or of decent quality, and well maintained for those less fortunate.

Be considerate when donating

When something seems too good to be true, it usually is. Unfortunately, in this case, it came at the expense of a charity that had to exhaust its precious resources for nothing.

Charities are voluntary organizations that go the extra mile to help those in need, so it’s not easy to hear donors profiting from their efforts.

Here’s a helpful rule of thumb for donating to charities: Put yourself in other people’s shoes and ask if you would use these items after you received them.

Do you have any news you need to share? Contact us by email at news@mustsharenews.com.

Featured image adapted from Reach Out on Facebook.


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A charity’s DEI is not a priority for donors https://donorsnet.net/a-charitys-dei-is-not-a-priority-for-donors/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 18:21:34 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/a-charitys-dei-is-not-a-priority-for-donors/ A charity’s DEI is not a priority for donors More than half (59%) of donors in the United States would continue to support a charity with a lack of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) because the cause is more important to them than DEI, while 28% think all organizations are bound to have issues with […]]]>

A charity’s DEI is not a priority for donors

More than half (59%) of donors in the United States would continue to support a charity with a lack of diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) because the cause is more important to them than DEI, while 28% think all organizations are bound to have issues with DEI.

Some 41% of donors would turn away a charity they have supported in the past if they found out that the organization’s culture tolerates discrimination against the people it serves. And 34% of survey respondents would not donate to charities that use culturally insensitive imagery and language in solicitations, with 17% saying they would not donate if they learned the council of directors of the charity is not diverse.

These are key data points in a new report from the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance (Give.org) titled “Special Donor Trust Report: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.” Dynata polled 2,171 Americans and 1,525 Canadians for their opinion of DEI, but the results were analyzed separately.

“We have found that donors appreciate DEI, but we also have to be realistic in that some are not interested in DEI as an agent of the charity and the causes it serves. Some respondents prioritize a cause over a DEI issue,” said Elvia Castro, associate director of charitable assessment for the BBB Wise Giving Alliance.

The majority of respondents equated a diverse, fair and inclusive board and staff (54%) with the positive trustworthiness of a charity. Nearly 20% of participants responded that a population served by a charity that is diverse in terms of race, ethnicity, disability status, gender identity, sexual orientation and religious identity is very important to them.

But compared to different workplaces, respondents overall think the lack of DEIs is a bigger issue outside of a charity. Some 18% of respondents think DEI neglect is a common problem for places of worship, 22.6% for businesses and 27.8% for government.

The diverse composition of board and staff members and representation in the community served by the charity was higher among younger generations, African Americans and Hispanics/Latinos, LGBTQ+, people who identify as Muslim or atheist and those who reported giving more than $5,000 per year.

When respondents were asked to consider who should be held accountable in charities for addressing IED, the result was:

  • 25% the Board of Directors
  • 23% the CEO or senior leader of the organization
  • 20% did not know
  • 19% all staff are responsible
  • 13% human resources.

The report’s authors concluded that there is a core group of potential donors who highly value DEI information when involved in giving.

“Every charity’s DEI journey is complex and unique. Charities come in many shapes and sizes and have different constituents. As such, DEI’s goals – and the path to them – are necessarily different for a large social service organization, a Muslim community organization, a neighborhood animal shelter, or a charitable healthcare provider. Yet, at a time of heightened awareness of DEI issues in society, charities should strive to ignite or maintain momentum around their own DEI path,” according to the report.

The report analyzes separately the results of the survey of Canadian donors. Of these respondents, 45% would not donate to a charity that they learned discriminated against the people they served; 42% would not donate if a charity’s work culture tolerated discrimination against staff; and 34% would not tolerate insensitive charitable solicitations.


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