Norfolk doctor recovering from heart transplant encourages organ donation

As a doctor who delivers babies, Keith Vrbicky is used to hospital rooms. But he never imagined that the symptoms that would manifest after a Labor Day birth of twins would put him in the spotlight as a patient. “It’s COVID until proven otherwise, right?” Vrbicky remembers thinking at the time. “So I went to the office and took a test which was negative.” His lungs contained fluid. His doctor ordered further tests. A heart scan would reveal blood clots. The Norfolk doctor suffered from heart failure. “Never being on the patient side, it was scary, really scary to not have that control anymore,” Vrbicky said of the diagnosis. And his situation quickly worsened. he arrived at our facility when he was put on ECMO, basically a heart-lung machine, it was about 10 days,” explained Dr. Scott Lundgren, Vrbicky specialist at Nebraska Medicine. “Things have progressed quite quickly.” A heart-lung machine is an invasive last resort that can create serious complications for patients. In extreme cases, its use can lead to amputations. “It doesn’t help the heart,” Lundgren said. “It bypasses the heart so the rest of the organs can get the blood they need.” Vrbicky needed a new heart, and he went on the transplant list. The doctor who helps bring new life to the world faced the possibility of his end. The statistics Vrbicky was looking at weren’t promising: 20% of people die because they don’t have a heart. “And here, 12 hours later, my wife gets a call from the doctor, there’s a match, and we’re going to do this transplant,” Vrbicky said. “It just doesn’t happen without divine intervention in our view.” The transplant went well and Vrbicky is recovering well, listening to his doctor’s orders. “He’s one of the few doctors who is also a model patient,” Lundgren joked. Vrbicky is using his new lease of life to raise awareness about organ donation, the act that saved him. The new heart should eventually allow Vrbicky to start giving birth again, once her strength is fully restored and the pandemic subsides. Transplant patients are prescribed anti-rejection drugs that can weaken their immune system. If you are interested in becoming an organ donor, Live On Nebraska maintains the registry in Nebraska.

As an obstetrician, Keith Vrbicky is a regular in hospital rooms.

But he would never have imagined that the symptoms that would manifest after the birth of twins on Labor Day would place him as a patient.

“It’s COVID until proven otherwise, right?” Vrbicky remembers thinking at the time. “So I went to the office and took a test and it was negative.”

His lungs contained fluid. His doctor ordered further tests.

A heart scan would reveal blood clots. The Norfolk doctor had heart failure.

“Never being on the patient side of things, it was scary, really scary to not have that control anymore,” Vrbicky said of the diagnosis.

And his situation was rapidly getting worse.

“From the time he arrived at our facility to the time he was put on ECMO, basically a heart-lung machine, it was about 10 days,” Vrbicky specialist Dr. Scott Lundgren explained to Nebraska Medicine. “Things moved forward quite quickly.”

A heart-lung machine is an invasive last resort that can lead to serious complications for patients. In extreme cases, its use can lead to amputations.

“It doesn’t help the heart,” Lundgren said. “It bypasses the heart so the rest of the organs can get the blood they need.”

Vrbicky needed a new heart and he got on the transplant list. The doctor who helps bring new life to the world faced the possibility of his end.

The statistics Vrbicky was looking at weren’t promising: 20% of people die because they didn’t have a heart.

“And then, 12 hours later, my wife receives a call from the doctor [that] there’s a game and we’re going to do this transplant,” Vrbicky said. “It just doesn’t happen without divine intervention in our view.”

The transplant went well and Vrbicky is recovering well, listening to his doctor’s orders.

“He’s one of the few doctors who is also a model patient,” Lundgren joked.

Vrbicky uses his new life to raise awareness about organ donation, the act that saved him.

“You know, honestly, I hadn’t thought about it much, but I don’t think about it all the time,” he said.

The new heart should eventually allow Vrbicky to start giving birth again, once her strength is fully restored and the pandemic subsides. Transplant patients are prescribed anti-rejection drugs that can weaken their immune system.

If you are interested in becoming an organ donor, Live On Nebraska maintains the registry in Nebraska.


Source link

Comments are closed.