Organ donation – Donors Net http://donorsnet.net/ Tue, 17 May 2022 22:35:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://donorsnet.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Organ donation – Donors Net http://donorsnet.net/ 32 32 A new research unit to help organ donor and transplant patients https://donorsnet.net/a-new-research-unit-to-help-organ-donor-and-transplant-patients/ Tue, 17 May 2022 02:12:16 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/a-new-research-unit-to-help-organ-donor-and-transplant-patients/ NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) has launched a set of £20 million UK blood, organ, plasma and stem cell research units, including one in Newcastle. Newcastle University is receiving nearly £2million for a cutting-edge research unit focused on organ donation to help improve outcomes for patients awaiting and receiving transplants. The five Blood and Transplantation […]]]>

NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) has launched a set of £20 million UK blood, organ, plasma and stem cell research units, including one in Newcastle.

Newcastle University is receiving nearly £2million for a cutting-edge research unit focused on organ donation to help improve outcomes for patients awaiting and receiving transplants.

The five Blood and Transplantation Research Units (BTRUs) – co-funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) and NHSBT – aim to provide new technologies, techniques or knowledge that will benefit donation , transfusion and transplantation.

Newcastle University experts are working with Cambridge University scientists for the NIHR BTRU in Organ Donation and Transplantation research unit – which is receiving a total of £4million.

The collaboration between Newcastle University and Newcastle Hospitals will be a key part of achieving the unit’s goals of increasing the number of organs available, improving long-term outcomes and improving quality. life after the transplant.

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Andrew Fisher, Professor of Respiratory Transplant Medicine at Newcastle University, Honorary Respiratory Clinician at Newcastle Hospitals and Deputy Director of the new NIHR BTRU in Organ Donation and Transplantation, said:

“We are delighted to co-host this new BTRU, dedicated to increasing the quantity and quality of organ transplants performed and tackling inequalities in access to organ transplants.

“Our team of researchers from Newcastle University and Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, spanning a wide range of disciplines, will continue to work closely with colleagues from Cambridge University and NHS Blood and Transplant to achieve unit goals.

“Input from patients and the public will play a central role in our work and form an important partnership to achieve maximum impact from the research performed.”

The research unit will involve a variety of work, including:

  • Test the use of enzymes to remove blood group A and B antigens from donated organs during machine infusion, to create universal donor O-type organs. This could transform clinical practice and particularly benefit ethnic minority groups who currently have reduced access to transplantation due to the high prevalence of blood type B.
  • Increase utilization of donated organs through image analysis. The unit will further develop an application capable of assessing the probable performance of an organ based on its appearance – for example, the amount of fat present on a given liver – giving a prediction of the outcome of the transplant.
  • Develop new patient-reported measures that assess the impact an organ transplant has had on a recipient’s well-being and assess the quality of their experience of going through an organ transplant journey.

Many streams of BTRU work could lead to new technologies and practices that could then be implemented, helping to save and improve even more lives.

They are multidisciplinary centers of excellence that will pursue cutting-edge research on donor health and behavior, improve transfusion practices in hospitals, increase the number of organs available, and improve long-term outcomes after organ transplant. solid organ, will develop new types of cellular therapies. for blood disorders and blood cancers and ultimately reduce the risk of transmitting infections through the work we do.

Developing innovative treatments

Health and Social Care Secretary Sajid Javid said: “These new research units will enable NHS Blood and Transplant to lead the way in the development of innovative treatments for blood disorders and blood cancer, enabling the NHS to save even more lives.

“It also means more people will have access to lifesaving donations, blood transfusions and cell therapy, which will help us address the disparities that exist among those awaiting organ and stem cell transplants. .

“I urge more people to consider becoming an organ, blood or stem cell donor, especially those from Black, Asian and other ethnic minorities.”

Dr Gail Miflin, NHSBT Chief Medical Officer, added: “Working with universities, these five new blood and transplant research units will help us fulfill our mission to ‘save and improve even more lives’ and drive innovation to inform future clinics. practice and improve patient outcomes.


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Organ donation video translated into 18 languages ​​to help people consider the gift of life — The Hull Story https://donorsnet.net/organ-donation-video-translated-into-18-languages-to-help-people-consider-the-gift-of-life-the-hull-story/ Mon, 16 May 2022 12:12:09 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/organ-donation-video-translated-into-18-languages-to-help-people-consider-the-gift-of-life-the-hull-story/ By Simon Bristow A critical care consultant from Hull has translated a video on organ donation into 18 languages ​​to help people of all cultures consider the gift of life. Dr. Harish Lad, Clinical Lead for Organ Donation at Hull University Hospitals (HUTH), has produced a series of videos in different languages ​​to promote organ […]]]>

By Simon Bristow

A critical care consultant from Hull has translated a video on organ donation into 18 languages ​​to help people of all cultures consider the gift of life.

Dr. Harish Lad, Clinical Lead for Organ Donation at Hull University Hospitals (HUTH), has produced a series of videos in different languages ​​to promote organ donation.

The NHS organ donation video is used by NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT) in TV advertising and on social media to support its ‘Leave Them Certain’ message, asking people to make sure their families are aware of their decision to donate organs in the event of their death.

Dr Lad, who works in critical care at Hull Royal Infirmary and Castle Hill Hospital, said: ‘We want to reach out to all communities to raise awareness of the importance of organ donation .

“These videos share key messages in people’s language, empowering them to think about and relate to the issue and helping them start having those vital conversations with loved ones.”

Every year, hundreds of transplant opportunities are missed because families don’t know exactly what their loved one would have wanted.

The ‘Leave Them Certain’ video features a son sharing memories of his father, the man laughing and dancing at family parties and having fun on family vacations.

The son says, “I remember dad’s dance steps, his murderous spot.” Dad was just a really happy character. I remember his smile.

The video shows the son standing in a hospital hallway. “But I also remember when they asked if he wanted to be an organ donor – and I just didn’t know.”

It ends with the message: “Talk to your loved ones about organ donation.

Dr. Lad arranged for the video to be translated into Arabic, Bengali, Urdu, Gujarati, Hindi, Punjabi, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Polish, Latvian, Lithuanian, Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Russian, Romanian and Greek.

An NHSBT spokeswoman said: “The translated versions of our Leave Them Certain the videos will really help engage a wider audience about the role of family in organ donation decisions and why talking to your loved ones is so important.

“We really appreciate the time and effort Dr. Lad has put into the project to enable this key activity and we look forward to hearing the impact of these videos within the communities.”


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BIKE TOUR TRAVELS THROUGH BRENHAM TO RAISING AWARENESS ABOUT ORGAN DONATION https://donorsnet.net/bike-tour-travels-through-brenham-to-raising-awareness-about-organ-donation/ Thu, 12 May 2022 13:36:45 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/bike-tour-travels-through-brenham-to-raising-awareness-about-organ-donation/ A bike tour traveled to Brenham on Wednesday, promoting and educating about the need for organ donations. Twelve volunteer cyclists from the Lone Star Circle of Life Bike Tour gathered at Fireman’s Park to share the story of why they ride and encourage others to help save a life by making a donation. The tour […]]]>

A bike tour traveled to Brenham on Wednesday, promoting and educating about the need for organ donations.

Twelve volunteer cyclists from the Lone Star Circle of Life Bike Tour gathered at Fireman’s Park to share the story of why they ride and encourage others to help save a life by making a donation. The tour travels across the state, honoring organ donors and their families as well as organ recipients.

Sarah Pipkin-Love is a heart transplant recipient from Corpus Christi who is rising to show how much of a difference a donation can make in a recipient’s life. She rode Wednesday in honor of Molly Hammac, daughter of Brenham resident Tracy Hammac. Molly died in a car accident in 2018 and changed the lives of 31 recipients as a tissue donor.

Pipkin-Love said Molly’s passion for giving back has positively impacted countless lives.

Retired Brenham firefighter Rob Aguilar was honored by Trooper Guy Hoffman II, who is a member of the Department of Public Safety. Aguilar is a blood donor and coordinated dozens of blood drives during his time with the Brenham Fire Department.

Aguilar said the need for donations is constant, but the means to contribute are not lacking.

The tour will travel to Austin today (Thursday) and wrap up tomorrow (Friday) in Temple.

Anyone wishing to become a donor can register with the Donate Life Texas registry.

Sarah Pipkin-Love shares why she is taking part in the Lone Star Circle of Life Bike Tour, after arriving in Brenham on Wednesday.
Guy Hoffman II (right) and Rob Aguilar speak about the need for organ donors during the Lone Star Circle of Life Bike Tour stop in Brenham on Wednesday.

A shirt filled with signatures that will be given to an organ recipient as a sign of support.
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Nevada Donor Network, Latin Chamber Partner for Latino Organ Donation Effort https://donorsnet.net/nevada-donor-network-latin-chamber-partner-for-latino-organ-donation-effort/ Wed, 11 May 2022 14:57:20 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/nevada-donor-network-latin-chamber-partner-for-latino-organ-donation-effort/ The decision to become an organ donor is more common among white donors than among colored donors. The Nevada Donor Network and the Nevada Latin Chamber of Commerce are partnering in a new statewide donor outreach program called “Heart of Hope” for the Latin American community. In Nevada, there are more than 600 people waiting […]]]>

The decision to become an organ donor is more common among white donors than among colored donors.

The Nevada Donor Network and the Nevada Latin Chamber of Commerce are partnering in a new statewide donor outreach program called “Heart of Hope” for the Latin American community.

In Nevada, there are more than 600 people waiting for organ transplants, and 140 are Latinos.

Steven Peralta, who runs the Nevada Donor Network, said Latinos and African Americans are less likely to become organ donors than white and AAPI communities. Peralta said much of this was due to a general mistrust of the healthcare system and false beliefs.

“If you’re an organ donor, they’re not going to [not] do whatever they can to save your life because they want your organs. It’s 100% false,” he said.

Another issue is addressing common cultural health issues that lead to organ failure.

“Obesity, high blood pressure, hypertension, diabetes… ultimately leads to kidney failure which ultimately leads to organ failure. This ultimately results in someone needing a transplant. So our campaign is about educating our community about some of these issues because we’re trying to stop transplants from happening first,” he said.

The “Corazon de Esperanza” or Heart of Hope awareness campaign will include bilingual information, and the Nevada Donor Network along with the Latin Chamber of Commerce will feature organ donors and transplant recipients to tell their stories in person.



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HBCU Medical Schools Work to End Racial Disparities in Organ Donation https://donorsnet.net/hbcu-medical-schools-work-to-end-racial-disparities-in-organ-donation/ Fri, 06 May 2022 14:15:00 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/hbcu-medical-schools-work-to-end-racial-disparities-in-organ-donation/ Photo: Monkey Business Images (Shutterstock) Some of the countries HBCU Medical Schools just announced a plan to partner with organ transplant advocacy groups to encourage more African Americans to register as organ donors. According to Associated Pressfour HBCU medical schools will work with the organ donation advocacy group and the association of organ procurement organizations […]]]>

Image for article titled HBCU Medical Schools Strive to End Racial Disparities in Organ Donation

Photo: Monkey Business Images (Shutterstock)

Some of the countries HBCU Medical Schools just announced a plan to partner with organ transplant advocacy groups to encourage more African Americans to register as organ donors. According to Associated Pressfour HBCU medical schools will work with the organ donation advocacy group and the association of organ procurement organizations on plans to reduce racial inequities in organ donation and build more trust in the system among people of color.

The announcement of May 5 comes after that of February 2022 report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, which pointed to racial inequities in the nation’s organ transplant system. For example, although blacks are three times more likely suffer from kidney failure than white people, they tend to wait longer for donor organs and ultimately are less likely to receive an organ transplant.

HBCUs participating in the initiative will include Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles, Howard University College of Medicine in Washington, Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, and Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta.

The new partnership will allow black medical and nursing students to learn directly from organ procurement organizations and transplant centers. There will also be several outreach components, including health fairs, blood drives and a plan to introduce K-12 students in black communities to healthcare careers.

According to data from the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Healthh, although nearly 29% of candidates waiting for organ transplants in 2020 were black, they made up only 13% of organ donors that year. And as a result, many black people are dying while waiting for the organs they desperately need. “The moment they get on the list, there is great urgency. And because of the long waits, many of them, of course, fail to get a transplant,” said Dr. James EK Hildreth, president and CEO of Meharry Medical College, in an interview with the PA.

But Dr. Clive Callender, a transplant surgeon and professor of medicine at Howard University College of Medicine, hopes this new initiative will have a positive impact on those negative statistics and ultimately save more black lives. “This collaboration will allow us to save thousands of lives across the country by strengthening relationships between healthcare workers, black and minority patients, and organ and transplant professionals,” he said.


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The impact of organ donation | Health Focus SA https://donorsnet.net/the-impact-of-organ-donation-health-focus-sa/ Thu, 05 May 2022 21:35:11 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/the-impact-of-organ-donation-health-focus-sa/ There are few ways to have a greater impact than through organ donation. According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, a single donor can save up to eight lives and improve up to 75 others. There is a huge need for organ donors. As of March 2022, more than 106,000 American men, women, and […]]]>

There are few ways to have a greater impact than through organ donation. According to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, a single donor can save up to eight lives and improve up to 75 others.

There is a huge need for organ donors. As of March 2022, more than 106,000 American men, women, and children were on the national transplant waiting list. Every nine minutes another person is added to the list.

In many cases, the wait can be incredibly long. This is because the need for viable organs to be transplanted far outweighs the number of willing, qualified donors. In Texas alone, more than 10,000 people are waiting for a transplant.

The organ donation process

Most transplants performed in the United States use organs from deceased donors. A person can either register for organ donation before death, or family members can agree to donate a loved one’s organs after death. You can also become a living donor.

When death is imminent, a medical team will place a potential donor on life support to keep organs functioning. During this time, clinicians will determine if the patient is brain dead, which means they no longer have any brain activity and can no longer breathe without intervention.

Once brain death has been declared, organ donation is possible. Organs that can be donated include kidneys, liver, lungs, heart, pancreas, intestines, hands and face. In some cases, corneas and body tissues are also donated.

An organ matching process helps determine if the person’s organs are in good condition and who will benefit. This is based on factors such as blood type, as well as time spent on the transplant waiting list and geographic location.

How to become an organ donor

If you want to register to become an organ donor, the registration process is relatively simple. You can submit your basic information to the Donate Life Texas registry, which will register you to donate your organs, eyes, and tissues after your death.

In 2021, more than 13 million Texans signed up for organ donation through Donate Life Texas — and more than 3,600 of them saved lives through organ donation after they died.

You can also register for organ donation when applying for a new or renewed driver’s license. Donate Life Texas, the Texas Department of Public Safety and the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles are teaming up to make this possible. If you wish, you can also make a monetary contribution to Donate Life Texas at the same time.

Do you have other questions about organ donation or how to register? Check out these answers to frequently asked questions.


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The donation of a living organ donation https://donorsnet.net/the-donation-of-a-living-organ-donation/ Thu, 05 May 2022 13:00:19 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/the-donation-of-a-living-organ-donation/ Dedrick Burch is in his early 70s and, in his own words, “as I always say, my much younger (three-year-old) sister,” Beverly Pierce, are living organ donor/recipient siblings. Pierce lived with polycystic kidney disease. By 2008, the disease had progressed considerably to the point that dialysis or a kidney transplant were imminent. Siblings Dedrick Burch […]]]>

Dedrick Burch is in his early 70s and, in his own words, “as I always say, my much younger (three-year-old) sister,” Beverly Pierce, are living organ donor/recipient siblings.

Pierce lived with polycystic kidney disease. By 2008, the disease had progressed considerably to the point that dialysis or a kidney transplant were imminent.

Siblings Dedrick Burch and Beverly Pierce | Credit: Dedrick Burch

“She’s a good Southern woman (siblings live in the Atlanta area) and was pretty stoic about it. She didn’t ask us for a kidney, but as close family we knew what was waiting for us and what the options were,” Burch said. “If she had been placed on a general transplant list, it could have been five years before a kidney was available.”

“She didn’t ask us for a kidney, but as close family we knew what to expect and what the options were.”

Pierce continued the story. “Dedrick was tested, we were almost perfectly compatible. He wanted and could become my living donor, which was a blessing for me.”

The process went quickly. Over the next few months, the siblings were prepared for donation and transplantation.

“There was an extremely thorough assessment. I met with a psychologist and another professional — I don’t remember his discipline — to make sure that my emotional health was stable, that the donation was voluntary and without coercion, and that no money was exchanged for the kidney,” Burch said.

Insurance benefits have been coordinated. The donation, transplant, and follow-up testing and care were fully subsidized by Pierce’s employer insurance coverage.

On the day of the transplant, Burch and Pierce were admitted to an Atlanta hospital. Burch’s kidney was removed and immediately transferred to his sister. He stayed in the hospital for two or three nights, he said.

“The surgeon was pleased with the results. He came to see me after the operation and said, ‘You’re going to feel like a truck has hit you for about a day. Then the recovery will follow at a steady pace,” Burch said. “He was right. My body was able to adapt to the loss of the kidney without any serious negative impact. I was out of work for a month, under the direction of the doctor, but it was not necessary. I bounced back quickly and easily.”

Pierce was hospitalized several days longer than her brother. She was released without incident and said, “His kidney has been working for me ever since.”

Within weeks, the two were back to their typical activities of daily living.

Now, 16 years after the donation and transplant, the siblings speak of “incredible results”.

Pierce reports that “I had no episodes of rejection, which is remarkable. These types of episodes are expected as part of the transplant process, and they just never happened with me.”

She takes a daily regimen of immunosuppressants, like all transplant recipients, and has been carefully monitored during the COVID pandemic due to her immune vulnerability.

“I changed my eating habits, especially with the amount of protein I ingest. Dedrick and I both became ‘sort of’ vegetarians,” Pierce said. “We don’t need to be strict but are careful with food choices. Since retiring Dedrick has become quite a sophisticated chef.”

Now in the spring of 2022, Pierce is preparing for his son’s wedding. Burch bikes through Portugal, volunteers for an Atlanta social service agency, and takes cooking classes.

As Pierce says, “It’s okay.”

Can I be a donor?

While most organs are taken from deceased people, living donors can donate a kidney, part of the liver, or another type of tissue as a life-saving transplant.

Organs from living donors have several advantages over organs from deceased donors. Recipients often spend less time waiting for an organ because they have actively recruited a living donor. The donor’s expenses are usually subsidized by the recipient’s insurance.

The surgery can be scheduled in advance, giving everyone time to breathe and prepare. Since the donor organ is functioning up to moments before transplantation, long-term results are improved and recovery times shortened for the recipient.

“Dedrick gave me a priceless gift for which I will always be grateful.”

Living donors are often related to the recipient, as was the case with Burch and Pierce. The increased likelihood of genetic matching tends to reduce the chances of organ rejection. Living donors must be at least 18 years old and usually no older than 65 for a kidney or 60 for a liver.

Donors undergo a thorough physical and mental health assessment to rule out underlying medical and psychological issues. An informed consent process ensures that the donor fully understands the risks and benefits of donation, is not coerced into volunteering, and understands the personal, emotional and social impact, particularly in the months following donation.

There are several ways to donate. Each year, Donate Life America helps raise awareness about organ donation and encourages Americans to register as organ and tissue donors. A directed donation is the donation of an organ to a parent, spouse, friend or unrelated person in need. There must be a physiological match with the recipient, especially that the blood and tissue types are compatible.

Some people, called good Samaritan donors, donate to a medically compatible stranger. A third type, known as paired donation or organ exchange, allows two or more pairs of living donors/recipients to “swap” the donor’s organs. Transplant centers connect incompatible pairs, ensuring that each recipient receives a compatible organ.

Become an organ donor

Living donation allows individuals to have a second chance for a better quality of life. As the world gradually reopens in the post-pandemic world, there is an increased need for organ donation.

Pierce said: “Seize the opportunity. I was so weak and it was hard to go through an ordinary day. I could do it, but I could tell I was sinking. Dedrick gave me a priceless gift that I will be ever grateful.”

“It was a pretty easy decision after we learned that we matched four of the six markers indicating that my kidney would give him a good life,” Burch said.

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Elk County and Penn Highlands youth encourage organ donation | News https://donorsnet.net/elk-county-and-penn-highlands-youth-encourage-organ-donation-news/ Mon, 02 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/elk-county-and-penn-highlands-youth-encourage-organ-donation-news/ DUBOIS — Toryn Zuchowski seems like your normal 10-year-old boy. He enjoys playing with his friends and his twin sisters, Gwen and Morgan. He enjoys watching football and going to school. But Toryn is not your typical boy. He suffers from a rare condition called biliary atresia, which occurs when the bile ducts inside or […]]]>

DUBOIS — Toryn Zuchowski seems like your normal 10-year-old boy. He enjoys playing with his friends and his twin sisters, Gwen and Morgan. He enjoys watching football and going to school. But Toryn is not your typical boy. He suffers from a rare condition called biliary atresia, which occurs when the bile ducts inside or outside the liver do not develop normally.

Toryn is one of the few children born in Pennsylvania to have this liver abnormality. He was diagnosed shortly after birth in June 2011 as stage 2, out of three stages. In stage 2, the underdeveloped ducts were not properly drained, which can lead to liver damage and cirrhosis of the liver, and can be fatal if left untreated.

Toryn was enrolled in a study at UPMC Children’s Hospital in Pittsburgh; and, at the age of eight weeks, the Kasia procedure was performed there. The Kasia procedure, which is usually the first treatment for biliary atresia, connects the liver to the small intestine, bypassing the abnormal ducts. During the operation, Toryn’s blocked bile ducts and gallbladder were removed and replaced with a segment of his small intestine.

The segment of his intestine was sewn to the liver and it now functions as a new extrahepatic bile duct system. Although the Kasia procedure does not cure biliary atresia, it can slow liver damage and delay or prevent complications and the need for a liver transplant.

Over the past decade, however, he has had multiple liver infections and suffers from cirrhosis of the liver. The disease caused massive bleeding in his stomach from the esophageal varices he developed, which resulted in extensive blood transfusions.

This spring, he is due to undergo the TIPS procedure which involves the insertion of a stent to help stop future bleeding and fluid buildup and relieve pressure from blood flowing through the diseased liver.

“Toryn doesn’t know what it’s like to feel good – it’s the only life he knows,” his mother, Melissa Zuchowski, who is a licensed practical nurse at Penn Highlands Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, told St. Marys. “He often tells us he hates being a ‘sick kid’ so his dad and I tell him ‘see what a huge impact you can have’.”

Toryn hopes the story of her ongoing journey will inspire others to become organ donors. Melissa Zuchowski feels fortunate to be employed by a health system – Penn Highlands Healthcare – which advocates organ, tissue and cornea donation.

More than 100,000 people across the country are waiting for life-saving transplants. Unfortunately, many people never have the chance to match with a suitable donor. Not everyone who registers as a donor can make a donation. In fact, only three out of 1,000 recently deceased people are eligible to make a viable donation. This nationwide shortage, combined with a long waiting list, results in many people dying while waiting for an organ donation. But you can make a difference by becoming an organ donor.

About 11,000 people die every year when they are considered medically fit to donate organs, tissues and corneas, but only a fraction donate. Anyone can be a potential donor, regardless of age, race or medical history.

The Center for Organ Recovery & Education (CORE) is one of 57 federally designated nonprofit organ procurement organizations in the United States. CORE partners with more than 150 hospitals and healthcare facilities to offer the gift of life by coordinating the surgical retrieval of organs, tissues and corneas for transplantation. CORE also facilitates computerized matching of donated organs, tissues and corneas. To become a donor, visit www.core.org/register. After registering, you should inform your family about your decision so that when the time comes they will not be surprised and can help you fulfill your wishes.

Because there is a shortage of organs and patients waiting for a liver may die or become too ill to undergo a transplant, living donor liver transplantation is an important option for many people on the list. waiting. Finding a living donor from a healthy adult (relative, friend, or altruistic donor) shortens the waiting time, increases long-term transplant success, and frees up a liver for a patient on the waiting list who has no this option.

In living donor liver transplantation, a portion of a donor’s healthy liver is transplanted into a recipient in need. Living donor liver transplantation is possible because the liver, unlike any other organ in the body, has the ability to regenerate (regrow). Most regeneration of donor and recipient livers occurs within the first eight weeks. For more information on liver disease, living donation and organ transplantation, visit the United Network for Organ Sharing at www.unos.org.


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UPMC Clinician: Surprising Facts About Organ Donation | Life https://donorsnet.net/upmc-clinician-surprising-facts-about-organ-donation-life/ Sun, 01 May 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/upmc-clinician-surprising-facts-about-organ-donation-life/ Making the decision to become an organ donor is an important decision. Every person who says yes to organ donation gives hope to the tens of thousands of people waiting for organ, eye and tissue donation. Many people have misconceptions about organ and tissue donation, which can discourage them from registering as organ donors. Each […]]]>

Making the decision to become an organ donor is an important decision. Every person who says yes to organ donation gives hope to the tens of thousands of people waiting for organ, eye and tissue donation.

Many people have misconceptions about organ and tissue donation, which can discourage them from registering as organ donors. Each organ donor has the potential to save eight lives and improve the lives of 75 others. This is why it is important to dispel these myths.

Here are eight facts that can help you make an informed decision about the gift of life:

Fact #1: If you are sick or injured, the priority of emergency medical personnel and doctors is to save your life. Your life always comes first. Donation only becomes a possibility when all methods of rescue have failed.

Fact #2: Advanced age and health do not automatically disqualify you from organ donation. No matter how old you are or if you have a chronic illness, you may be able to become an organ donor. Organs were donated by donors between the ages of 80 and 90.

If you have a medical condition such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or even cancer, medical tests and doctors will determine which organs can be donated. Some organs may not be healthy enough to be transplanted, but others can help save lives. Regardless of your medical history, you should always register to become an organ donor.

Fact #3: One donor can save or improve the lives of 75 others. You’re not just saving one life, you can save eight lives by donating your organs, restore two people’s sight, and heal over 75 lives through tissue donation. You might hear stories about life-saving heart transplants, but you can also donate organs like your stomach, intestines, lungs, and pancreas. Connective tissues, skin, bones, bone marrow and even corneas can also be donated.

Fact #4: Your wallet or the fame of your reality TV star cannot put you at the top of the list of donors. It doesn’t matter if you’re wealthy or well-known when it comes to organ donation. A national system matches available donor organs with people on the waiting list based on blood type, body size, health status, geographic location, tissue type and time on the list.

Fact #5: More than 106,000 people are waiting for a life-saving transplant. Currently, there are 112,000 people on the waiting list for organ donation, and another person is added to the waiting list every 10 minutes.

Fact #6: There are two ways to become an organ donor. There are two types of donors, living donors and deceased organ donation.

You can donate a kidney, bone marrow or part of your liver as a living donor, and you don’t have to be a parent to be compatible. This gives the thousands of people on the donation list another option and can save more lives. The living donation process begins with an assessment at an approved transplant center, such as the Living Donor Assessment Clinics for Kidney and Liver at UPMC Williamsport.

The second way to become a donor is to register to donate your organs upon death. You can register as a donor when you register for your driver’s license or you can register online.

Fact #7: It costs nothing to become an organ donor. When you become a donor, the associated costs never accrue to the deceased donor’s family members, the donor’s family only pays for pre-death medical costs and costs associated with funeral arrangements.

Fact #8: All major religions endorse organ donation. Leaders of all major religions are considering authorizing, enabling and supporting organ donation. It is often thought of as a last act of generosity towards others.

April is National Gift of Life Month. Discuss your organ donation wishes with your family and take the step to register as a donor. Together, we can close the gap between the number of eligible donors and the number of people on the waiting list.

Established in 1981, UPMC Transplant Services has performed over 20,000 organ transplants. This includes liver, kidney, pancreas, small intestine, heart, lung, double lung, single lung, and multiple organ transplants. As a pioneer in solid organ transplantation, our program has been challenged with some of the most difficult and complex cases. To learn more about organ, eye or tissue donation or to register to become a donor, visit UPMC.com/DonateLife.






Heidi Weeder, RN, CCRN Clinician, UPMC Organ and Tissue Donation Council




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Pediatric Transplant Awareness Week, Organ Donation – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana Weather forecast https://donorsnet.net/pediatric-transplant-awareness-week-organ-donation-wish-tv-indianapolis-news-indiana-weather-forecast/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 18:09:55 +0000 https://donorsnet.net/pediatric-transplant-awareness-week-organ-donation-wish-tv-indianapolis-news-indiana-weather-forecast/ INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Organ donation is often a difficult journey for people waiting for these life-saving gifts. Finding an organ donor for children is particularly difficult. Today is the end of Pediatric Transplant Awareness Week, part of “Gift of Life Month”. Max Grau, 10, and his doctor, Dr. Islam Ghoneim with Ascension St. Vincent. It […]]]>

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) — Organ donation is often a difficult journey for people waiting for these life-saving gifts. Finding an organ donor for children is particularly difficult.

Today is the end of Pediatric Transplant Awareness Week, part of “Gift of Life Month”.

Max Grau, 10, and his doctor, Dr. Islam Ghoneim with Ascension St. Vincent.

It has been three years since Grau received his organ donation. Grau’s mother donated a kidney to her son. “It was the best day of my life and it was good,” Grau said.

Grau’s message to the public is that he wants more people to be organ donors.

“One of the things to be aware of is that children with chronic conditions, especially at a young age, impact their overall development and their ability to grow and reach their potential. Time really pressing. That’s why it’s so important that children receive their organ and their life-changing gift at such an early time. Rather than treating chronic conditions on the list. Plus, finding a suitable donor, a matched donor, is something that tends to be a bit more difficult. Especially when size is a consideration,” Ghoneim said. “You have to have a compatible blood type. You also have to be of an appropriate tissue. Size tends to count mostly with thoracic organs, but in abdominal organs we’re fortunate that adults can donate to children, and so there’s this that tends to make things a little easier with the abdominal organs.

According to Ghoneim, you can register to become an organ donor here.

You can also register as a living organ donor with St. Vincent Ascensionand any Bureau of Motor Vehicle.

“It’s very very reaffirming the greater good that happens with organ donation and the fact that organ donation transcends age, gender, race. It unties us in so many ways and helps with challenge children at such a young age to realize their potential and not have to deal with such incredible chronic diseases,” Ghoneim said.


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